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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the battlefields. interesting because you still see it, you know, in daily life at big hospitals. but also even on the battlefields they've started taking medical commodities, these forward tentsz and moving them forward for that same reason. there's been a lot of lessons more recently from iraq and afghanistan. you've been talking to people about that. >> what doctors are telling us, and it's sad to think but it's a basic fact, tens of thousands have been wounded in this war. so you have this giant population that they are learning from. and what they're basically learning they will tell you, i think, is dynamic innovative, fast-moving medical care. try new things. try and see what you can accomplish with new techniques, new procedures, because they can't stick to just the old way of doing business. these kids are coming back with traumatic injuries that are very, very tough. they got to find a way to deal with them. and you find doctors and nurses out there trying new things. things that may be in your emergency room not too far from them. >> i'm not quite sure how to say this but i think on
now getting ready to deploy. for these men and women heading off to war, a big city hospital like the one where i work, can be a perfect training ground. >> reporter: dr. john renshaw stops to check on one of his patients. he suffered massive injuries at his job when he was caught in a conveyer belt. his cousin translates into their native haiti. renshaw is an oncologist. he treats cancer. why is he here? dr. john renshaw is major john renshaw, united states air force. he's deploying to the front lines of afghanistan to treat the war wound. but before he goes, he along with other military medical personnel will complete a tour of duty here at the university of maryland shock trauma center in baltimore. sharpening their ability to deal with critical trauma patients. >> the wounds appear to be superficial. >> category "a" now. >> trauma. >> trooper one. 15 up, 10 minutes back, fall from tree. category "a," priority 1. >> every day, dozens of trauma patients are wheeled into these bays. some are accident victims. this young man came with multiple stab wounds. but right alongside the
, heading off to war, a big city hospital like the one where i work, can be a perfect training ground. >> this doctor stops to check on an injured patient. he suffered massive abdominal injuries at the maryland factory job when he was caught in a conveyer belt. >> we will keep an eye on that. >> his cousin peter translates into the creole of their native haiti. but rimshaw treats cancer. why is he here? dr. john renshaw is deploying to the frontlines of stafghanistano treat the war wounded. before he goes, he along with other medical personnel, will complete a tour at the university of maryland trauma center in baltimore. sharpening their ability to deal with critical trauma patients. >> the worunds appear to be superfici superficial. >> trauma. >> trooper one. 15 up. ten minutes back. category a. priority one. >> every day, dozens of trauma patients are wheeled into the bays. some are accident victims. this young man came with multiple stab wounds. right alongside the civilian trauma doctors, nurses and techs and military personnel. >> the injuries that i treated here are the closest
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)